January 30, 2017

1939


Suspect in Quebec Mosque Attack Quickly Depicted as a Moroccan Muslim. He’s a White Nationalist. (The Intercept)

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer exploited the attack to justify President Trump’s ban on immigrants from seven Muslim-majority countries. “It’s a terrible reminder of why we must remain vigilant and why the President is taking steps to be proactive rather than reactive when it comes to our nation’s safety and security,” Spicer said at this afternoon’s briefing when speaking of the Quebec City attack.

But these assertions are utterly false. The suspect is neither Moroccan nor Muslim. The Moroccan individual, Mohamed Belkhadir, was actually one of the worshippers at the mosque and called 911 to summon the police, and played no role whatsoever in the shooting.


Trump fires acting AG after she declines to defend travel ban (CNN.com)

President Donald Trump fired acting Attorney General Sally Yates Monday night for “refusing to enforce a legal order designed to protect the citizens of the United States,” the White House said.

“(Yates) has betrayed the Department of Justice,” the White House statement said.


Questions multiply over Bannon’s role in Trump administration (Washington Post)

Bannon has no job experience in foreign policy. After serving in the Navy for seven years in the late 1970s and early 1980s, his eclectic career took him to Goldman Sachs, to consulting to documentary filmmaking and then to the running of Breitbart News, a far-right website known for peddling conspiracy theories.

From his perch as chief of Breitbart News, which produced a satellite radio show, Bannon cemented his role as a champion of the alt-right, an anti-globalism movement that has attracted support from white supremacists and helped power Trump’s populist White House victory.

Trump sees Bannon as a generational peer who shares his anti-establishment instincts and confrontational style. According to several people familiar with their relationship, Bannon has cultivated a rapport with Trump over security issues in recent months, and impressed Trump with his grasp of policy in talks they have held together with top intelligence and military officials.


Starbucks to hire 10,000 refugees worldwide after Trump ban (Yahoo.com)

Message from Howard Schultz to Starbucks Partners: Living Our Values in Uncertain Times

We are living in an unprecedented time, one in which we are witness to the conscience of our country, and the promise of the American Dream, being called into question.

The promise prompted #boycottstarbucks to trend on Twitter, here is a sampling of some of the tweets:

On the anti-boycott front:

On the pro-boycott front, it was framed as stealing American jobs from Americans. Weirdly, mainly black people and veterans featured prominently in the narrative, presumably as representative of America’s version of refugees for those pro-boycott?


We started to see an interesting framework develop where the credit for what is happening in the US is shifting from Trump to Bannon. This may be a particularly effective tactic. Trump is nothing if not a narcissist. One can imagine that he will not tolerate anyone overshadowing his moment in the sun, and if the messaging in the media increasingly focuses on Bannon instead of Trump, perhaps he will distance himself from this dangerous demagogue, which can only be a good thing.

President Bannon? (NYT)

As his first week in office amply demonstrated, Mr. Trump has no grounding in national security decision making, no sophistication in governance and little apparent grasp of what it takes to lead a great diverse nation. He needs to hear from experienced officials, like General Dunford. But Mr. Bannon has positioned himself, along with Mr. Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, as the president’s most trusted aide, shutting out other voices that might offer alternative views. He is now reportedly eclipsing the national security adviser, retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn.

While Mr. Trump long ago embraced Mr. Bannon’s politics, he would be wise to reconsider allowing him to run his White House, particularly after the fiasco over the weekend of the risible Muslim ban. Mr. Bannon helped push that order through without consulting Mr. Trump’s own experts at the Department of Homeland Security or even seeking deliberation by the N.S.C. itself. The administration’s subsequent modifications, the courtroom reversals and the international furor have made the president look not bold and decisive but simply incompetent.


How Trump’s Immigration Order Is Affecting Higher Education (The Atlantic)

There will be wide-ranging effects on post-secondary education that are of particular interest to me, not the least of which will be on enrollment and retention rates. Students from affected countries mid-research who cannot pursue research or leave the country, students from other countries who cannot now journey to the US to present research at conferences, professors who are now limited from travel either into or out of the US. This has cast a dark shadow, indeed.


Tech companies to meet on legal challenge to Trump immigration order (Reuters)

A group of technology companies plans to meet on Tuesday to discuss filing an amicus brief in support of a lawsuit challenging U.S. President Donald Trump’s order restricting immigration from seven Muslim-majority countries, said a spokesperson for a company organizing the gathering.

The meeting is being called together by GitHub, which makes software development tools.

Amicus, or friend of the court, briefs are filed by parties who are not litigants in a case but want to offer arguments or information to the judge.

Alphabet Inc’s Google, Airbnb Inc and Netflix Inc are among the companies invited, a separate person familiar with the situation said.

Representatives for Google and Netflix could not immediately be reached for comment. An Airbnb spokesman declined to comment.

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